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Autism Conference 2013 Dates For Your Diary

 

SAAS AUTISM CONFERENCE 2013

please click to book

Agenda

9.30 am Registration

10.00 welcome SAAS

10.15 am Key Speaker Danny Page

12.00 lunch buffet lunch

1.00pm workshop one (choice of three workshops)

1.45pm break

2.00pm workshop two (choice of three workshops)

2.45pm break

3.00pm Q & A

4.00PM Close

*subject to change

 

Key speaker

Danny Page

 

Sarah Hewitt

Zoe Thompson (see full profile futher on)

all amazing speakers and you will learn so much from this conference

 

Kevin Healey said~ "Danny is one of the best speakers i have heard in the last ten years is knowledge and understanding of this hidden condition is amazing"

and more speakers biography details to follow soon on this page

amazing Autism conference 

With 3 workshops in the afternnon

(inc drinks and buffet lunch)

May 13th 2013

Rodbaston Hall South Staffordshire,

Rodbaston Drive,

Penkridge ST19 5PH

 

start time 10.00

finish 4.00pm

Danny’s career in Health and Social Care commenced some 15 years ago and he has enjoyed a varied and successful career within the Social Care sector. Danny is a hugely passionate professional who has fully embraced his natural ability and empathy to train and pass on knowledge and his experience; he is totally committed to life long learning of individuals within the Social care environment and the positive impact that development has on clients, service users and individuals. With his detailed and thorough understanding of the sector, combined with his unique, passionate and inspiring delivery, Danny’s learner feed back is consistently second to none. Danny is constantly expanding his knowledge and skill set, not only to expand his own training portfolio, but also to up skill, quality assess and support the Training Team at Fairway Training.

But how did Danny get here? 

Danny tells a story of how he was “enjoying” a stay in hospital as a 9 year old. He shared some time with a young boy who was also unwell and Danny reflects on the care and support that the boy received from a person called “a Social Worker”.
Danny had never heard of them before, or what the role involved, but “I want to be one of them” he proclaimed! 

This drive and passion as well as a natural empathy for others, led to Danny undertaking his Diploma in Social Work way back in the late 90’s a course he passed with flying colors.  

Looking for a role and a career to make a difference, Danny took a position as a support Worker in a small home for Young Adults with Autism. Nine years later he was still there having worked his way from the bottom to the top. 

He was ultimately responsible for 3 sites providing support to some 23 service users and a staff bank of over 60.
 

He had managed to develop his team enabling the homes to all become 4* rated without any recommendations and a shining light of the quality of care that can so often go by the wayside as poor care gets the headlines. It was during this period of success that Danny also achieved his degree in Autism and used his experiences to create a team and environment that provided such a difference to the service users who he and his team supported.

Danny’s biggest achievement (in his own opinion) was that he understood the person behind the condition, making them happy and spreading his passion and understanding of Autism to his team. This was a key reason behind him not only having such a high degree of success and compliance with CQC but also in becoming one of the youngest managers within the borough.  

At the very core of the ethos was that he ensured (in times before Person Centered Planning became accepted and widely adopted) that the support that was provided was based entirely on the person, the individual at the very centre of the service. It is a doctrine that he has maintained to this day. 

Danny is proud that he has always been at the coal face, very hands on and able to see and understand Autism and the entire spectrum. To be able (in his words) to “see it all”. He realized that he wasn’t just there to be caring and to offer support but to teach and be a role model, to offer guidance over every day living skills and to make sure that he had a positive impact on every individual

With a further Health and Social Care degree under his belt, Danny moved in to the world of vocational training and ultimately lecturing within his specialist field. He worked hard to provide the direction, support and mentoring required to assist learners to achieve their NVQ’s, specifically within Learning Disabilities.

Danny has always been a natural mentor of people, especially those who have a particular passion for Learning Disabilities and Autism. In his 2 years at Fairway Training he has developed a team, an ethos and a culture of learning that has lead to great success. Fairway Training has focused on how to engage Care and Support Workers, to fill them with enthusiasm and to promote positive values.


“Learning can and should be professional but also fun” he says and without doubt, the feedback received on a consistent basis reflects that very approach.


“The best training I have ever had” “The most fun course I have sat on” and to quote Kevin Healy himself  “Danny Page is a breath of fresh air when it comes to AUTISM, dedicated, compassion, and most of all he knows about Autism inside/out, a remarkable trainer, keeps everyone's attention, I have met many trainers but no one compares to Danny, his knowledge and in-depth sight to Autism is just amazing, 5* presentation and a great trainer that everyone needs to learn from".

Danny’s focus starts with the view of “consider the impact on the individual” reflect on your practice, your skills and your understanding. 

Most of all, celebrate individuality.

 

Speaker biography – Zoe Thompson

 

Zoe is Mum to two boys, one of whom has autism without a learning disability. She lives with her family in Diggle on the outskirts of Oldham.

 

With her husband, Dixon, she set up the charity Bright Futures, and has recently opened Bright Futures School. www.brightfuturesschool.co.uk Bright Futures School brings a new approach to autism education by looking at autism as a condition of atypical development and considering the implications of this for learning.

 

Zoe is Head of Development at the school where she advises, trains and monitors staff in using a special approach to support pupils in developing the competencies that enable them to manage uncertainty and change.

 

The school’s social and emotional development curriculum runs alongside the academic curriculum. It is influenced by the principles and practice behind Relationship Development Intervention ® (RDI).

 

Zoe is a qualified RDI ® Consultant and was an NAS Councillor between 2006 and 2011. She is currently part of a small group convened by the NAS looking at how to present information on autism interventions. Zoe was one of two parent representatives on the group set up to develop NICE guidelines on the recognition, referral and diagnosis of autism in children.

 

She has previously worked in the health service; for a local authority; as a Grants Officer for the Big Lottery Fund; and with Dixon, ran her own business supporting voluntary sector organisations to access funding. She has a wide experience in the voluntary sector, having been on the management committee of several organisations focusing on: women’s health, community-based education and training; and arts development.

 

She is active in supporting other parents to access appropriate help and support for their children with autism, having helped several families to challenge inadequate provision, including supporting parents at SEN tribunals and judicial reviews.

 

Her article ‘Adapt and Thrive’, looking at why teaching ‘social skills’ to children with autism often misses the mark, was published in the SEN Magazine, issue 51, April 2011.

 

Zoe presented at the NAS’ Autism Education Roadshow in Newcastle in November 2011.

 

Zoe writes a blog detailing how RDI has helped her son. http://notnigellanotjamie.blogspot.com

 

Zoe is on Twitter @notnigellajamie


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